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BCIT Citations Collection

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Endogenous TrkB ligands suppress functional mechanosensory plasticity in the deafferented spinal cord
Dorsal root injury (DRI) disrupts the flow of sensory information to the spinal cord. Although primary afferents do not regenerate to their original targets, spontaneous recovery can, by unknown mechanisms, occur after DRI. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), but not nerve growth factor or neurotrophin-4, are upregulated in the spinal gray matter after DRI. Because endognous BDNF and NT-3 have well established roles in synaptic and axonal plasticity, we hypothesized that they contributed to spontaneous recovery after DRI. We first developed a model of DRI-induced mechanosensory dysfunction: rat C7/8 DRI produced a deficit in low-threshold cutaneous mechanosensation that spontaneously improved within 10 d but did not recover completely. To determine the effects of endogenous BDNF and NT-3, we administered TrkB-Fc or TrkC-Fc fusion proteins throughout the recovery period. To our surprise, TrkB-Fc stimulated complete recovery of mechanosensation by 6 d after DRI. It also stimulated mechanosensory axon sprouting but prevented deafferentation-induced serotonergic sprouting. TrkC-Fc had no effect on low-threshold mechanosensory behavior or axonal plasticity. There was no mechanosensory improvement with single-bolus TrkB-Fc infusions at 10 d after DRI (despite significantly reducing rhizotomy-induced cold pain), indicating that neuromodulatory effects of BDNF did not underlie mechanosensory recovery. Continuous infusion of the pan-neurotrophin antagonist K252a also stimulated behavioral and anatomical plasticity, indicating that these effects of TrkB-Fc treatment occurred independent of signaling by other neurotrophins. These results illustrate a novel, plasticity-suppressing effect of endogenous TrkB ligands on mechanosensation and mechanosensory primary afferent axons after spinal deafferentation., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received Oct. 2, 2006; revised March 26, 2007; accepted April 20, 2007.
Enhancing student engagement and learning effectiveness through multi-role contributions and collaborative exams
This project proposes teaching-learning coupling as students take different roles during the course, from being learners, teachers, and proponents; finally, students take exams in a collaborative manner – initially, their exam is done individually followed by a team consultation period for the exam completion., Not peer reviewed, report
Environmental regulation, asymmetric information, and moral hazard
This paper presents a model of environmental regulation in the presence of measurement costs and asymmetric information. Environmental regulation can be viewed as a form of agency problem where the polluting firms may have better information about the true level of their abatement activities than the regulator. If certain aspects of environmental quality are costly to measure, regulators may resort to proxies to infer information about environmental quality. This may allow firms to circumvent the regulatory constraints by maximizing along those margins that are costly to measure. This problem is especially acute when a single firm produces multiple pollutants., Essay, Published.
Evaluating the use of potentially hazardous secondary aggregates in concrete based on life-cycle effects on water pollution
Proceedings from the 28th International Conference on Solid Waste Technology and Management, Philadelphia, PA U.S.A, March 10-13, 2013., Peer reviewed, Conference proceeding
Evaluation of the antiproliferative effects of Essiac on in vitro and in vivo models of prostate cancer compared to paclitaxel
Essiac, a widely consumed, sparsely tested herbal tea, was evaluated for preparation consistency and antiproliferative effects on prostate cancer cells and xenografts. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to compare different lots of Essiac and evaluate extraction consistency by comparing peak areas in concentrated preparations. Repeated analysis of one lot showed < 2% RSD between corresponding peaks. Absolute peak areas varied widely between lots, but similarity in relative size of corresponding peaks was observed. Cytotoxic effects of Essiac were tested in vitro by crystal violet assay and analysis of cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, but no differences between control and treatment groups was observed. Paclitaxel was used as a positive control in cell cycle analysis and was the only treatment which showed significant effects on cell cycle distribution. Toxicity in nude mice was tested, and efficacy in inhibiting PC-3 xenograft growth. No toxicity or tumour size difference was observed dosing up to 240 mg/kg QD, over 28 days, excepting the positive control group treated with paclitaxel. Ki-67 and PCNA expression was analyzed in treated tumors, but no difference in expression of either marker was observed. These evaluations suggest Essiac has no marked antiproliferative effect on the models tested., Peer-reviewed article, Published.
Evidence-based solution to information sharing between criminal justice agencies
This paper originates from a project done for and with the assistance of the Operations Strategy Branch, E Division, Royal Canadian Mounted Police. The aim of this study was to test a technological solution to two traditional limitations of information sharing between criminal justice agencies: data quality and privacy concerns. Entity Analytics Software (EAS) was tested in two studies with North American criminal justice agencies. In the first test, duplicated cases held in a police record system were successfully identified (4.0%) to a greater extent than the traditionally used software program (1.5%). This resulted in a difference of 11,954 cases that otherwise would not have been identified as duplications. In the second test, entity information held separately by police and border officials was shared anonymously between these two organizations. This resulted in 1,827 alerts regarding entities that appeared in both systems; traditionally, this information could not have been shared, given privacy concerns, and neither criminal justice agency would be aware of the relevant information held by the other. Data duplication resulted in an additional 1,041 alerts, which highlights the need to use technological solutions to improve data quality prior to and during information sharing. While only one potential technological solution (EAS) was tested and organizations must consider the potential expense associated with implementing such technology, the implications resulting from both studies for improved awareness and greater efficiency support and facilitate information sharing between criminal justice organizations., Research paper, Published.
Evolutionary design of gene networks
The co-evolution of species with their genomic parasites (transposons) is thought to be one of the primary ways of rewiring gene regulatory networks (GRNs). We develop a framework for conducting evolutionary computations (EC) using the transposon mechanism. We find that the selective pressure of transposons can speed evolutionary searches for solutions and lead to outgrowth of GRNs (through co-option of new genes to acquire insensitivity to the attacking transposons). We test the approach by finding GRNs which can solve a fundamental problem in developmental biology: how GRNs in early embryo development can robustly read maternal signaling gradients, despite continued attacks on the genome by transposons. We observed co-evolutionary oscillations in the abundance of particular GRNs and their transposons, reminiscent of predator-prey or host-parasite dynamics., Peer-reviewed article, Published.
Evolutionary techniques for image processing a large dataset of early drosophila gene expression
Understanding how genetic networks act in embryonic development requires a detailed and statistically significant dataset integrating diverse observational results. The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is used as a model organism for studying developmental genetics. In recent years, several laboratories have systematically gathered confocal microscopy images of patterns of activity (expression) for genes governing early Drosophila development. Due to both the high variability between fruit fly embryos and diverse sources of observational errors, some new nontrivial procedures for processing and integrating the raw observations are required. Here we describe processing techniques based on genetic algorithms and discuss their efficacy in decreasing observational errors and illuminating the natural variability in gene expression patterns. The specific developmental problem studied is anteroposterior specification of the body plan., Peer-reviewed article, Published.
Experimental investigation of moisture transfer between concrete foundation and sill plate
Precipitation is one of the most common moisture sources on which building designers focus. Water comes from both top down and bottom up. Although foundations are sometimes constructed out of pressure-treated lumber, generally they are constructed from poured concrete. In a wet climate zone, the foundation of a house is often under continuous contact with moisture, which is mainly caused by rundown rainwater, wet soil, a high water table, or a combination of all these factors. This causes rot growth and decay of the wood-frame structure as it sits constantly on the damp foundation concrete. In this research, moisture transfer between concrete and wood is investigated under three different scenarios: a case with direct wood and concrete contact and two cases with different moisture barriers between the two materials. The moisture barrier materials considered in this study are the damp-proofing layer and sill plate gasket. The moisture transfer processes in these three cases are investigated in a field experimental setting using a customized experimental setup for 1 year. The experimental data suggest that using damp proofing and a sill gasket helps restrict moisture transfer., Peer reviewed article, Published. Received: May 29, 2015; Accepted: December 09, 2015; Published online: February 24, 2016.
Experimental investigation of the sound absorption characteristics of vegetated roofs
An experimental investigation of the sound absorption characteristics of vegetated roof substrates and plots has been completed. First, an impedance tube was used to measure the normal-incidence absorption coefficients of substrates and their constituents. Substrates provided significant sound absorption, with coefficients varying from 0.03 at 250 Hz to 0.89 at 2000 Hz. Absorption increased with the percentage of organic matter and decreased with moisture content and compaction. A multi-variable regression model was developed for predicting the absorption of substrates. Secondly, the sound absorption of vegetated roof plots was investigated using the spherical-decoupling method. An optimal method, validated in an anechoic chamber, was used to determine the diffuse-field absorption coefficients of unplanted and planted rooftop test plots. Sound absorption increased with increased substrate depth (without vegetation) and decreased with the addition of vegetation and plant establishment. The mean noise reduction coefficient of established vegetated roof plots, with distinctly different plant communities in substrate depths of 50–200 mm, ranged from 0.20 to 0.63 when evaluated over a two-year period. The results confirm that the sound absorption of vegetated roofs is a function of substrate depth, plant community establishment, and moisture content in the plants and substrate., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received 4 March 2015, Revised 22 April 2015, Accepted 23 April 2015, Available online 1 May 2015.
Experimental investigation of the wetting and drying potentials of wood frame walls subjected to vapor diffusion and wind-driven rain loads
This paper aims to study the effects of wind-driven rain load and vapor diffusion on the hygrothermal performance of wall systems in a wet and mild climate through a field experimental study. In the study, four test panels with a combination of vapor barrier and capillary break are manufactured, instrumented and installed in a field experimental facility. The wetting and drying potentials of the test panels in response to a predominately vapor diffusion and a wind-driven rain load are discussed based on the analysis of 15 months of measurement data. The experimental result shows that, in a yearly basis, the wetting and drying rates of a wall without a capillary break are about two times higher than that of the wall with a capillary break. While the wetting and drying rates are comparable in a wall system with a vapor barrier, the drying rate is 38% higher than the wetting rate in a wall with no vapor barrier. In general, a wall with no vapor barrier wets and also dries faster than a wall with a vapor barrier. For the wall types and climate considered in this paper, the wetting rates of walls with a predominately wetting mechanism of vapor diffusion and wind-drive rain load are comparable. In general, the experimental data suggest that even in a mild climate, vapor diffusion is a critical moisture load with comparable effect that wind-driven load induces., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received 14 February 2015, Revised 10 May 2015, Accepted 11 May 2015, Available online 19 May 2015.
An experimental study of the physicochemical properties of a cement matrix containing dredged materials
Recently, the amount of dredged soil material (DM) has been rapidly increasing in Korea due to four major river maintenance projects and new harbor construction. DM waste is mostly dumped into the ocean, while only a small part of it has been utilized for coastal reclaiming, or as filling and backfilling material. This study carried out physical and chemical tests to map out a specific plan for utilizing DM in a mortar mixture. The compressive strength tests and microstructure analysis using XRD and SEM of cement mortar contained DM were performed as a replacement for fine aggregate or as a filler material of mortar matrix. The study measured the impact of contaminants contained in DM and how silt and clay influenced the compressive strength of the mortar., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received April 7th, 2011; revised May 16th, 2011; accepted June 1st, 2011.
Feasibility of sensory tongue stimulation combined with task-specific therapy in people with spinal cord injury
Background Previous evidence suggests the effects of task-specific therapy can be further enhanced when sensory stimulation is combined with motor practice. Sensory tongue stimulation is thought to facilitate activation of regions in the brain that are important for balance and gait. Improvements in balance and gait have significant implications for functional mobility for people with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). The aim of this case study was to evaluate the feasibility of a lab- and home-based program combining sensory tongue stimulation with balance and gait training on functional outcomes in people with iSCI. Methods Two male participants (S1 and S2) with chronic motor iSCI completed 12 weeks of balance and gait training (3 lab and 2 home based sessions per week) combined with sensory tongue stimulation using the Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator (PoNS). Laboratory based training involved 20 minutes of standing balance with eyes closed and 30 minutes of body-weight support treadmill walking. Home based sessions consisted of balancing with eyes open and walking with parallel bars or a walker for up to 20 minutes each. Subjects continued daily at-home training for an additional 12 weeks as follow-up. Results Both subjects were able to complete a minimum of 83% of the training sessions. Standing balance with eyes closed increased from 0.2 to 4.0 minutes and 0.0 to 0.2 minutes for S1 and S2, respectively. Balance confidence also improved at follow-up after the home-based program. Over ground walking speed improved by 0.14 m/s for S1 and 0.07 m/s for S2, and skilled walking function improved by 60% and 21% for S1 and S2, respectively. Conclusions Sensory tongue stimulation combined with task-specific training may be a feasible method for improving balance and gait in people with iSCI. Our findings warrant further controlled studies to determine the added benefits of sensory tongue stimulation to rehabilitation training., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received: 10 July 2013 ; Accepted: 2 June 2014 ; Published: 6 June 2014.
Fibroblast growth factor treatment produces differential effects on survival and neurite outgrowth from identified bulbospinal neurons in vitro
The in vivo application of appropriate trophic factors may enhance regeneration of bulbospinal projections after spinal cord injury. Currently, little is known about the sensitivities of specific bulbospinal neuron populations to the many identified trophic factors. We devised novel in vitro assays to study trophic effects on the survival and neurite outgrowth of identified bulbospinal neurons. Carbocyanine dye crystals implanted into the cervical spinal cord of embryonic day (E)5 chick embryos retrogradely labeled developing bulbospinal neurons. On E8, dissociated cultures containing labeled bulbospinal neurons were prepared. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 (but not FGF-1) promoted the survival of bulbospinal neurons. FGF receptor expression was widespread in the E8 brainstem, but not detected in young bulbospinal neurons, suggesting that nonneuronal cells mediated the FGF-stimulated survival response. Astrocytes synthesize a variety of trophic factors, and astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) also promoted the survival of bulbospinal neurons. As might be expected, FGF-2 function blocking antibodies did not suppress ACM-promoted survival, nor did an ELISA detect FGF-2 in ACM. This suggests that nonneuronal cells synthesize other factors in response to exogenous FGF-2 which promote the survival of bulbospinal neurons. Focusing on vestibulospinal neurons, dissociated (survival assay) or explant (neurite outgrowth assay) cultures were prepared. FGF-2 promoted both survival and neurite outgrowth of identified vestibulospinal neurons. Interestingly, FGF-1 promoted neurite outgrowth but not survival; the converse was true of FGF-9. Thus, differential effects of specific growth factors on survival or neurite outgrowth of bulbospinal neurons were distinguished., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received 10 September 1999; Accepted 18 January 2000; Available online 25 May 2002.
Functional level assessment of individuals with transtibial limb loss
The functional level (K level) of prosthetic users is used to choose appropriate prosthetic components, but ratings may highly subjective. A more objective and robust method to determine K level may be appealing. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between K level determined in the clinic to K level based on real world ambulatory activity data collected by StepWatch. Twelve individuals with transtibial limb loss gave informed consent to participate. K level assessments performed in the clinic by a single treating prosthetist were compared with a calculated estimate based on seven days of real world ambulatory activity patterns using linear regression. There was good agreement between the two methods of determining K level with R2 = 0.775 (p < 0.001). The calculated estimate of K level based on actual ambulatory activity in real world settings appears to be similar to the treating prosthetist’s assessment of K level based on gait observation and patient responses in the clinic. Clinic-based ambulatory capacity in transtibial prosthetic users appears to correlate with real world ambulatory behavior in this small cohort. Determining functional level based on real world ambulatory activity may supplement clinic-based tests of functional capacity., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Date received: 2 December 2015; Accepted: 20 January 2016; First Published March 9, 2016.

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