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BCIT Citations Collection

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Integrated analysis of whole building heat, air and moisture transfer
There is a continuous dynamic heat, air and moisture (HAM) interaction between the indoor environment, building envelope and mechanical systems. In spite of these interdependences, the current indoor, building envelope and energy analysis tools are used independently. In this paper a holistic HAM model that integrates building envelope enclosures, indoor environment, HVAC systems, and indoor heat and moisture generation mechanisms, and solves simultaneously for the respective design parameters is developed. The model is benchmarked with internationally published test cases that require simultaneous prediction of indoor environmental conditions, building envelope moisture performance and energy efficiency of a building., Peer reviewed article, Published. Received 26 February 2009, Accepted 11 March 2010, Available online 16 April 2010.
Intelligent Micro Grid research at BCIT
Proceedings of IEEE EPEC’08 Conference, Vancouver, Oct 2008. This paper describes a major research initiative by British Columbia Institute of Technology for the construction of an Intelligent Micro Grid on its campus in Burnaby, BC, Canada., Conference paper, Published.
Introductory mathematics for computer science
4th custom edition., Not peer reviewed, Book, Published.
Introductory mathematics for computer science
3rd custom edition for BCIT., Published., Peer reviewed, Book
Introductory mathematics for computer science
Taken from: Basic technical mathematics : with calculus, metric version, seventh edition by Allyn J. Washington, Logic and computer design fundamentals, second edition, updated by M. Morris Mano and Charles R. Kime. Custom edition for British Columbia Institute of Technology., Book, Published., Peer reviewed
Investigation of the moisture buffering potential of magnesium oxide board
Research report submitted to Peter Francis, President, MAGO Building Products Ltd in April 2016. Passive humidity control in buildings can be achieved by incorporating materials with moisture buffering potential in that these materials absorb moisture at peak times and give off the stored up moisture at low moisture production times thereby stabilizing the interior relative humidity. Some of the advantages of this phenomenon include but are not limited to energy savings, improvement of thermal comfort and perceived air quality. As such, it is necessary to investigate different materials for their moisture buffering capabilities. As part of product development, the moisture buffering characteristics of Magnesium oxide board (Magnesia board) is experimentally investigated. Other considerations such as the impact of surface finishing and ventilation are also assessed. The experiment is done by monitoring twin buildings termed the Whole Building Performance Research Laboratory (WBPRL) while measuring the relative humidity evolution in time. One is set as the reference building and finished with gypsum wallboard owing to its wide industry use. The other is set as the reference building and covered with the Magnesia board. Both buildings are first validated under non-hygroscopic conditions to ensure similar hygrothermal loading and operation of both buildings. Next, four tests are conducted to simulate surface treatments, ventilation effects, and occupancy density. For each test run, four cases are created for different surface treatment configurations. From the test, it is found that magnesia board and gypsum demonstrate similar moisture buffering characteristics. In the as-in service case where the gypsum wallboard is painted with latex paint, as it is the current common practice, and magnesia board with the company specified paint, the later demonstrates slightly better moisture buffering due to the high permeability surface treatment., Research report, Published.
Iterated belief change
Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-05) in Edinburgh, Scotland, 2005. We use a transition system approach to reason about the evolution of an agent’s beliefs as actions are executed. Some actions cause an agent to perform belief revision and some actions cause an agent to perform belief update, but the interaction between revision and update can be nonelementary. We present a set of basic postulates describing the interaction of revision and update, and we introduce a new belief evolution operator that gives a plausible interpretation to alternating sequences of revisions and updates., Conference paper, Published.
Iterated belief change due to actions and observations
In action domains where agents may have erroneous beliefs, reasoning about the effects of actions involves reasoning about belief change. In this paper, we use a transition system approach to reason about the evolution of an agent's beliefs as actions are executed. Some actions cause an agent to perform belief revision while others cause an agent to perform belief update, but the interaction between revision and update can be non-elementary. We present a set of rationality properties describing the interaction between revision and update, and we introduce a new class of belief change operators for reasoning about alternating sequences of revisions and updates. Our belief change operators can be characterized in terms of a natural shifting operation on total pre-orderings over interpretations. We compare our approach with related work on iterated belief change due to action, and we conclude with some directions for future research., Peer-reviewed article, Published.
Lessons learnt from the shotcrete repair of the Powell River concrete hulks, and their applicability to other marine structures
Background : Concrete structures can be damaged by many chemical or physical processes. Where such damages affect appearance, serviceability or structural integrity, repair may be required. 10 decommissioned concrete ships form a massive floating breakwater on the Malaspina Strait in the City of Powell River in British Columbia, Canada. The ships are subjected to extremely onerous conditions, namely in the salt water splash zone under seasonal freeze-thaw cycling. This paper provides anecdotal evidence based on condition assessments after repairs were car-ried out, on how a well-matched repair concrete can significantly extend the service life of these and similar sorts of marine structures. Methods: Condition assessment was carried out using sounding, visual examination, photo and video documentation, compressive strength testing, splitting tensile strength testing, chloride ion concentration testing, and half-cell potential testing. Results: It was found that the areas which had been repaired had fared very well, with no observable de-terioration. The non-repaired areas of the structures had continued to deteriorate, particularly in non-submerged areas, close to the waterline, along with new impact damage. Conclusion: Durable concrete repairs can be achieved even for concrete exposed to extreme environ-mental conditions. Key conditions for such repairs are: complete removal of the deteriorated portions of the original concrete, removal of all loose corrosion products from exposed reinforcing steel, prepara-tion of a clean, firm, rough, surface dry but partially or fully water saturated, substrate surface, selection of a compatible repair material, use of an application technique which facilitates high bond strength between substrate and repair material, adequate curing, and protection of the repair material while immature., Peer-reviewed article, Published. Received: September 12, 2015; Revised: December 19, 2015; Accepted: June 28, 2016.
Life-cycle performance framework for building sustainability
Proceedings from the International High Performance Buildings Conference 2010. In spite of the progress in the development of methods and tools to support sustainable building design, there is still a lack of a formal method to bridge the “no man’s land” gap between the traditional building engineering disciplines, and between these and the architecture, to achieve the level of building integration required for sustainability. The framework described in this paper is an attempt to develop such a method. The framework, grounded on building science, facilitates a comprehensive assessment of the life-cycle performance of buildings and building systems, by enabling multiple function-performance factors of a building to be addressed iteratively. Quantitative methods and test protocols can be incorporated into the framework for assessing the long-term viability of proposed solutions. The organization of the underlying principles of building life-cycle performance described in this paper will hopefully conduct to a more integrated treatment of buildings in research, education, and practice., Peer reviewed, Conference proceeding, Published.
Limiting cases for spectrum closure results
The spectrum of a first-order sentence is the set of cardinalities of its finite models. Given a spectrum S and a function f, it is not always clear whether or not the image of S under f is also a spectrum. In this paper, we consider questions of this form for functions that increase very quickly and for functions that increase very slowly. Roughly speaking, we prove that the class of all spectra is closed under functions that increase arbitrarily quickly, but it is not closed under some natural slowly increasing functions., Peer-reviewed article, Published.
Linking education and research
Proceedings of 2010 IEEE Transforming Engineering Education: Creating Interdisciplinary Skills for Complex Global Environments, Dublin, Ireland, 6-9 April 2010. Most engineering careers will require engineers to work in multi-disciplinary teams. It is necessary for post-secondary institutions to provide opportunities for engineering students to work in multi-disciplinary teams during their education so that they can function and thrive in these environments upon graduation. One model for introducing and sustaining multi-disciplinary engineering education has been to link a number of the British Columbia Institute of Technology's (BCIT) engineering and technology capstone projects with the hub of multi-disciplinary researchers at the BCIT Technology Centre., Conference paper, Published.

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